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[CATATAN HARIAN SAYA] #MenulisAdalahMelawan #MenulisAdalahPembebasan - Yose Rizal Triarto - Yogyakarta, 20 November 2017.

Wednesday, November 22, 2017

Ngobrol Ekonomi Bareng KSP Convention Hall UIN Sunan Kalijaga Lt. 1

 

Terima kasih atas kesempatan dan apresiasi yang diberikan oleh Kantor Staf Presiden Republik Indonesia dan UIN Sunan Kalijaga Yogyakarta dalam acara "Ngobrol Ekonomi Bareng KSP" Kantor Staf Presiden Republik Indonesia, dari jam 9.30 sd jam 12 lebih sedikit pagi jelang siang hari ini di Convention Hall UIN Sunan Kalijaga Lt. 1 Yogyakarta.

Mug hitam cantik bertuliskan "Istana Kepresidenan Republik Indonesia" ini adalah kenang-kenangan/souvenir dari Kantor Staf Presiden Republik Indonesia untuk 1 dari 10 penanya terpilih dalam sesi Q&A tadi.

Acara sungguh menarik dan menyenangkan sekali bisa ngobrol dan bertanya-jawab seputaran masalah-masalah ekonomi negeri ini dan problematika di luarnya. Hanya sangat disayangkan tidak adanya sertifikat partisipasi dan handout materi/fotocopy presentasi dari pembicara yang dapat dibawa pulang oleh peserta.

Semoga dan mungkin ini bisa menjadi masukan yang positif untuk rekan-rekan panitia dari Fakultas Ekonomi dan Bisinis Islam UIN Sunan Kalijaga Yogyakarta dan Kantor Staf Presiden Republik Indonesia untuk penyelenggaraan acara-acara yang serupa ke depannya. Terima kasih.

CC: SEMA FEBI UIN Sunan Kalijaga Yogyakarta.

Wednesday, November 15, 2017

University of Pennsylvania English for Media Literacy Statement of Accomplishment


Thank you so much for the opportunity and knowledge, dear American English at State, University of Pennsylvania and U.S. Department of State Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, Office of English Language Programs. I have completed English for Media Literacy from the University of Pennsylvania for FREE.

Grade Achieved: 100.0%.

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Statement of Accomplishment

U.S. Department of State Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, Office of English Language Programs
University of Pennsylvania
American English at State

Congratulations!

You have completed English for Media Literacy from the University of Pennsylvania

Ian Nichols
Language Specialist
English Language Programs

Lauren Fiori
Advising Specialist
English Language Programs

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English for Media Literacy
University of Pennsylvania

About this Course

Welcome to English for Media Literacy, a course created by the University of Pennsylvania, and funded by the U.S. Department of State Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, Office of English Language Programs.

This course is designed for non-native English speakers who are interested in learning more about U.S. media literacy. In this course, you will explore different types of mass media; such as, newspapers, magazines, television, and social media. This course will also give you the opportunity to develop a broader understanding of the role media plays in our lives, while building your vocabulary and giving you the language skills needed to analyze what you read and watch. The first unit in this course will provide an introduction to media literacy and give you an opportunity to evaluate your own media literacy level. In unit 2, you will learn how to identify facts versus opinions in the media. The next unit in the course will focus on the differences between social media and traditional media, while unit 4 will look at how gender and identity are covered in the media. In the final unit of the course, you will demonstrate your increased media literacy by through a culminating final project on social media.

Anyone may take this course for free and get a Statement of Accomplishment issued by the University of Pennsylvania. If you want to get a Coursera Verified Certificate for free, please fill out the Financial Aid form.

Development of this course was funded by the U.S. Department of State Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs Office of English Language Programs. Unless otherwise noted, all course materials are available for re-use, repurposing and free distribution under a Creative Commons 4.0 Attribution license.

Taught by: Lauren Fiori, Advising Specialist
English Language Programs
Taught by: Ian Nichols, Language Specialist
English Language Programs

Language:    English (Volunteer to translate subtitles for this course)
How To Pass:    Pass all graded assignments to complete the course.
User Ratings:    Average User Rating 4.8

Syllabus

WEEK 1
Unit 1: Introduction to Media Literacy
In this unit, you will learn what media literacy means and how you can improve your own media literacy skills.
11 videos, 8 readings, 7 practice quizzes:
Graded: Check Your Understanding: William Cowen Interview
Graded: Assessment 1: Self-Assessment of Media Literacy Skills
Graded: Check Your Understanding: "Can you Separate Fact from Fiction?"
Graded: Check Your Understanding: "Debate over Free Press in Ukraine Suffers from Old Stereotypes"

WEEK 2
Unit 2: Types of Media: Traditional vs. Social
In this unit you will learn about the differences between traditional and social media, and learn the language necessary to compare them.
11 videos, 8 readings, 8 practice quizzes:
Graded: Check Your Understanding: "Study Finds Most Americans Get News from Social Media"
Graded: Assessment 1: Compare Traditional and Social Media
Graded: Check Your Understanding: "5 Ways Social Media Helps Syrian Refugees"
Graded: Check Your Understanding: "Real or Not? Snowboarder's Video in Question"

WEEK 3
Unit 3: Advertising
In this unit, you will learn how advertisers use media to market their products.
13 videos, 9 readings, 6 practice quizzes:
Graded: Check Your Understanding: Interview with Nancy Bollinger
Graded: Assessment 1: Advertising, thinking critically about ads, and targeting audiences
Graded: Check Your Understanding: "Internet Ads Outpace Print for First Time"
Graded: Check Your Understanding: "Advertisers Join the Search for Friends Online"
Graded: Unit 3 Assessment 2 (Option 1): Recorded Analysis of an Advertisement

WEEK 4
Bias in the Media
In this unit, we will discuss the meaning of media bias and several common types of bias.
12 videos, 9 readings, 7 practice quizzes:
Graded: Check Your Understanding: "For the Press, Elections are a Test of Accountability"
Graded: Check Your Understanding: "Are Facebook’s Trending Topics Unfair?"
Graded: Unit 4 Assessment 2: Media Bias (recorded option)

WEEK 5
Diversity and the Media
In this unit, we will learn about the importance of including people from various races, cultures, and genders in mainstream media.
11 videos, 10 readings, 6 practice quizzes:
Graded: Check Your Understanding: "Minorities See Improvement, Demand more Diversity on US Television"
Graded: Unit 5 Assessment 1: True or False: Media Diversity
Graded: Check Your Understanding: "Native Americans Take Control of Their Story"
Graded: Check Your Understanding: "Social Media Highlights Sexism in Olympics Coverage"
Graded: Unit 5 Assessment 2: How Different Groups are Depicted in the Media

How It Works

GENERAL

How do I pass the course?
To earn your Course Certificate, you’ll need to earn a passing grade on each of the required assignments—these can be quizzes, peer-graded assignments, or programming assignments. Videos, readings, and practice exercises are there to help you prepare for the graded assignments.

What do start dates and end dates mean?
Most courses have sessions that run multiple times a year — each with a specific start and end date. Once you enroll, you’ll have access to all videos, readings, quizzes, and programming assignments (if applicable). Peer-graded assignments can only be submitted and reviewed once your session has begun. If you choose to explore the course without purchasing, you may not be able to access certain assignments. If you don’t finish all graded assignments before the end of the session, you can enroll in the next session. Your progress will be saved and you’ll be able to pick up where you left off when the next session begins.

What are due dates? Is there a penalty for submitting my work after a due date?
Within each session there are suggested due dates to help you manage your schedule and keep coursework from piling up. Quizzes and programming assignments can be submitted late without consequence. However, it is possible that you won't receive a grade if you submit your peer-graded assignment too late because classmates usually review assignment within three days of the assignment deadline.

Can I re-attempt an assignment?
Yes. If you want to improve your grade, you can always try again. If you’re re-attempting a peer-graded assignment, re-submit your work as soon as you can to make sure there’s enough time for your classmates to review your work. In some cases you may need to wait before re-submitting a programming assignment or quiz. We encourage you to review course material during this delay.

PEER-GRADED ASSIGNMENTS

Peer-graded assignments require you and your classmates to grade each other’s work.

How do peer graded assignments work?
After you submit your work, you’ll be asked to review your classmates’ assignments. To pass, you’ll need to earn a passing grade on your submission and complete the required number of reviews.

How are grades calculated?
You and your classmates will be asked to provide a score for each part of the assignment. Final grades are calculated by combining the median scores you received for each section.

What kind of feedback should I give?
Be respectful, encouraging, and honest. Acknowledge what your classmate did well and offer specific suggestions on how they can improve. Scores should reflect the learner’s understanding of the assignment prompt and points should not be deducted for difficulties with language or differences in opinion.

Is there a penalty for submitting my work late?
No, but it’s important to submit your work as close to the due date as you can. Classmates grade most of the assignments within three days of the due date. If you submit yours too late, there may not be anyone to review your work.

If I fail an assignment, can I try again?
Yes! You’ll can always try again, but you’ll need to resubmit your work as soon as possible to make sure your classmates have enough time to grade your work.

Can I edit my assignment?
Yes, but you’ll need to re-submit your work and any grade you’ve already received will be deleted.

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FAQs
> When will I have access to the lectures and assignments?
As soon as you enroll in a course, you’ll have access to all videos, quizzes, and programming assignments (if applicable). Peer review assignments become available once your session has officially begun. If you choose to explore the course without subscribing by using the audit option, you may not be able to access certain assignments.

> What if I need additional time to complete the course?
Most courses run on sessions that start every 2-4 weeks. Deadlines are suggested to help you stay on track, but if you fall behind, you can simply switch to a later session. Your grades and progress will transfer to the new session with you. There is no limit to the number of sessions you can join, so feel free to take as much time as you need.

> Can I take this course for free?
You can access all videos, readings, and discussions, free of charge. You can also submit assignments and earn a grade for free. If you want to earn a Course Certificate, you can subscribe or apply for financial aid.

>What is the refund policy?
Subscription payments are non-refundable.

>UNIQUE TO THIS COURSE: Can I take this course for free?
Yes, this course is open and fully available for free. Learners will have the option to register for a Coursera certificate for purchase or through financial aid.

How It Works

Coursework
Each course is like an interactive textbook, featuring pre-recorded videos, quizzes and projects.

Help from Your Peers
Connect with thousands of other learners and debate ideas, discuss course material, and get help mastering concepts.

Certificates
Earn official recognition for your work, and share your success with friends, colleagues, and employers.

Creators
University of Pennsylvania
The University of Pennsylvania (commonly referred to as Penn) is a private university, located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States. A member of the Ivy League, Penn is the fourth-oldest institution of higher education in the United States, and considers itself to be the first university in the United States with both undergraduate and graduate studies.

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English language learners! Participate in the "English for Media Literacy" MOOC starting October 16! During this FREE, five-week online course, learners will develop and practice English language skills related to different forms of media. Learners will develop critical thinking skills as they read and evaluate different types of media, such as social media, blogs, podcasts, television, film, newspapers, and magazines. Enroll for FREE today, but hurry, enrollment ends October 21! All prospective learners can register by visiting www.tinyurl.com/moocmedia

Tuesday, November 14, 2017

My Week 5 Submission English for Media Literacy MOOC by University of Pennsylvania


Peer-graded Assignment: Unit 5 Assessment 2: How Different Groups are Depicted in the Media

You passed!
Congratulations. You earned 8 / 8 points. Review the feedback below and continue the course when you are ready. You can also help more classmates by reviewing their submissions.

Instructions
Consider how different groups (racial, ethnic, cultural, women, etc.) are depicted in the media in your country. How does this affect you personally?

Review criteria
Everyone enrolled in the course must complete 3 peer reviews to ensure all assignments are graded. However, many students complete more than 3 to help their peers who are still waiting. Be fair and have fun!

Your submission should include:

Features of Media/Length:
    *an explanation of how different groups are shown in the media in your country
    *an explanation of how this affects you personally
    *at least 5 sentences

Transitions:
    *at least 2 transitions

Prompt
Think about how the different groups that you are a part of are shown in the media in your country. How does the way they are shown affect you? Do they make you think differently about yourself? If you need to, review video 8 to get ideas.

Be sure to review transitions (Video 7). Try to find some places to insert transitions to better organize your thoughts and ideas. You will need to use at least two transitions in your paragraph.

When you are ready to write, be sure to write at least five sentences.

My Week 5 Submission:

Talking about mass and media opinions in Indonesia regarding the minority group discrimination and where I stand still
Submitted on November 14, 2017

Hi. I am 32 years old, male, an Indonesian-Chinese-Christian, and I am a freelance writer also, so yes I am part of the minority group in Southeast Asia country, Indonesia.

As you maybe knew, the Ahmadiyya, Shiite and Christian communities in Indonesia are still discriminated against in performing their worship and have physical attacks from Islamic militant groups - those Islamic militant group always claimed to be as national majority group- with so little help and intervention from the government.

To be honest Indonesia's major medias are still considered to give minimal attention to minority groups in Indonesia. Yet so far, the government often ignored the rights of those minority groups post-conflict.

Well yes, the Indonesian government claimed (both in traditional and official social medias) to have given protection to all religious followers.

However, in reality most of those claimed are not true. Remember what happened during the 19th Jakarta Governor election, some of major news and media were wrongly mentioned and had just one side shown about Ahok, or Basuki Tjahaja Purnama. Basuki Tjahaja Purnama is an Indonesian politician and former governor of Jakarta. He is also known by his Hakka Chinese nickname Ahok. Although I think he is a good politician, too bad he must ended in jail for something I believed he never bad mentioned purposely -to blame the other majority religion in Indonesia.

The Indonesian rules and specific electronic transaction and information law were so too flexible and subjective applied during his court. And yet he was so brave to came for every summon from police and judicial order -to proven he was innocent but yet still punished.

He and his family were deeply injured in their heart and therefore unable to playing the role in Indonesian politics and bureaucracy anymore. But many of good people and citizen in Indonesia believe he will back.

On the contrary when I were reading and watching the other news and media publication and reviews during that time, I saw something different on the foreign news and media, like CNN and DW. They tried to put everything more proper and balanced.

I have some new friends from America and Australia, both of them are in the World Class Professor (WCP) programme and visited Gadjah Mada University in Yogyakarta, Indonesia, several times last week. And what they said was so different than the local or national news and media here. More clear and gave me so much enlightenment specially when spoke about "Developing Investigative journalism in a post-truth era".

I agreed with what the summarized of video 8 that we are not limited to what the media tells us we are or we should be. We must analyze media messages not just to understand more about the people around us, but to understand more about ourselves as well.

And for some noted to be honest I think we should listen and learn also to those who are professionally and have a lot of experienced in media and journalism to analyze the media messages. Their point of view surely will help and guide us to more understood and learned comprehensively about the matters.

And I must say many thanks also to our instructors, staff, and friends who reviewed and gave good grading and appreciation on their comments in this English for Media Literacy MOOC from the University of Pennsylvania. I believed many of us agreed that those matters, videos, quizzes, discussions, and many other activities gave us more better understanding than before.

I even thought about going to college to continue my master degree in the field of media and journalism after following this 5 weeks online course. Thank you.

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 Course Overview Introduction to Media Literacy


Welcome to English for Media Literacy from the University of Pennsylvania

Dear Yose Rizal Triarto,

Welcome to English for Media Literacy! This course is designed for non-native English speakers who are interested in learning more about U.S. media literacy, how it impacts society, and how it shapes public opinion. We are excited to have you in the course and look forward to helping you improve English language skills necessary for analyzing, evaluating, and synthesizing mass media.

To begin, we recommend taking the time to review the course site. In “Course Content” you will find all of the course video lectures, readings, games, and quizzes. You can also navigate to the course quizzes and assessments under the “Assignments” tab. Click “Discussions” to see forums where you can discuss the course material with fellow students taking the class.

This course will take six weeks to complete. You can checkout the course schedule below to see a quick overview of the lessons and assignments you’ll complete each week.

Week 1-2: What is Media Literacy?
Assessment 1: Reading Comprehension: Predicting beforereading, identifying main ideas and details, understanding new vocabulary
Assessment 2: Spoken Discussion Board: Define media literacy in your own words

Week 2-3: Fact vs.Opinion (Bias)
Assessment 1: Word Choice: Identifying language with negative/positive connotations
Assessment 2: Spoken Discussion Board: Share your thoughts on how the attached print at chooses certain language to express specific opinion

Week 3-4: Social Media vs. Traditional Media
Assessment 1: Comparatives/Superlatives
Assessment 2: Written Discussion Board: Compare and contrast the differences between social media and traditional media

Week 5-6: Gender and Identity
Assessment 1: Summaries
Assessment 2: Written Discussion Board: Summarize astereotypical role that the media portrays for either males or females

Final Project: Create an advertisement for a product using social media

We look forward to having you in class!

Sincerely,
Ian Nichols and the English for Media Literacy Team

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English for Media Literacy

About this course: 

Welcome to English for Media Literacy, a course created by the University of Pennsylvania, and funded by the U.S. Department of State Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, Office of English Language Programs.

This course is designed for non-native English speakers who are interested in learning more about U.S. media literacy. In this course, you will explore different types of mass media; such as, newspapers, magazines, television, and social media. This course will also give you the opportunity to develop a broader understanding of the role media plays in our lives, while building your vocabulary and giving you the language skills needed to analyze what you read and watch. The first unit in this course will provide an introduction to media literacy and give you an opportunity to evaluate your own media literacy level. In unit 2, you will learn how to identify facts versus opinions in the media. The next unit in the course will focus on the differences between social media and traditional media, while unit 4 will look at how gender and identity are covered in the media. In the final unit of the course, you will demonstrate your increased media literacy by through a culminating final project on social media. 

Anyone may take this course for free and get a Statement of Accomplishment issued by the University of Pennsylvania. If you want to get a Coursera Verified Certificate for free, please fill out the Financial Aid form. 

Development of this course was funded by the U.S. Department of State Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs Office of English Language Programs. Unless otherwise noted, all course materials are available for re-use, repurposing and free distribution under a Creative Commons 4.0 Attribution license.

Created by: University of Pennsylvania
University of Pennsylvania
Taught by: Lauren Fiori, Advising Specialist
English Language Programs
Taught by: Ian Nichols, Language Specialist
English Language Programs

---
English language learners! Participate in the "English for Media Literacy" MOOC starting October 16! During this FREE, five-week online course, learners will develop and practice English language skills related to different forms of media. Learners will develop critical thinking skills as they read and evaluate different types of media, such as social media, blogs, podcasts, television, film, newspapers, and magazines. Enroll for FREE today, but hurry, enrollment ends October 21! All prospective learners can register by visiting www.tinyurl.com/moocmedia

Saturday, November 11, 2017

My Week 4 Submission English for Media Literacy MOOC by University of Pennsylvania


Peer-graded Assignment: Unit 4 Assessment 2: Peer-Reviewed Media Bias (written option)

You passed!
Congratulations. You earned 12 / 12 points. Review the feedback below and continue the course when you are ready. You can also help more classmates by reviewing their submissions.

Instructions
Find an article or video from a media source that you think is biased. Describe the source and explain why you think it is biased.

Review criteria
Everyone enrolled in the course must complete 3 peer reviews to ensure all assignments are graded. However, many students complete more than 3 to help their peers who are still waiting. Be fair and have fun!

Your response should include:
    *Description of a biased article or video: who, where, etc.
    *The type of bias
    *Explanation of why you think it's this type of bias

My Week 4 Submission:
Yesterday I read the article from one of the Indonesian News & Media Website in their official Facebook page -because it has the blue verified check page icon-  with the title after I translate din English here as "Educating Boys To Be Feminist". For easy to spell and remember, I must said this media name is beginning with T something. In the front of their link  I saw a picture with a really nice drawing instruction with all Indonesian language and background setting about how to educating boys to be feminist and with the further words in the below of that picture said I translated here as "Why be afraid of feminist labels? Being a feminist means becoming a more human human being". At the first time I saw and read that title my reaction was, wow, I definitely must see this because I want to know more about the feminism and gender equality.

So I clicked the link and went to read that topic. I had to see the big picture of Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, his wife, Sophie Gregoire and their three children were laughing and playing in the sofa, at the first thing come up after the article headline "Educating Boys To Be Feminist". The first thing in their article was about Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's opinion and hope that he wanted to raise his daughter and son into a feminist. He is concerned about the vulnerable conditions of women in Canada, discrimination, and various stereotypes that limit them to their dreams. The followed by the opinion from Gloria Steinem, she is an American political and feminist activist that said she's glad, we've started raising our daughters the same way we educate boys. In the middle part of this article I read some Neuroscientists and Psychologist around the Europe said almost the same thing to support the idea about being feminist even from the age of children. The editor and the writer of this particular article does not forget to put back a picture with a really nice drawing instruction and example about how to educating boys to be feminist, but with some extra detailed instructions inside the picture. And again put some opinion from the other famous American chief executive newsletter and writer about their research in the America. Obviously, in this whole article I finished read and understood there was no such thing as the own research and opinion related to the Indonesian boys from this Indonesian News & Media Website in their official Facebook page with name is beginning with T something. So there was no such thing as how to educating Indonesian boys to be feminist.

I think this article was bias by placement. They did try to make me and other Indonesia people think that it was a good article with good and catching illustration about how to educating boys to be feminist in really Indonesian illustration and language as referenced. But at the end, the whole article after I clicked their link and doing whole time reading, there no such thing as educating Indonesian boys to be feminist. Off course and I must to admit, the editor and the writer from that particular article were tricky and dare enough not to say for Indonesian boys. Instead of mentioning what should be in the link article, they wrote and drew a really nice picture with illustrations that using all Indonesian language and background setting. Well of course I am not against any feminist values even the idea of gender equality I agreed. But they did try to make me and other Indonesia people think it was an important article by talking about it at the beginning of their article. Off course the gender equality and feminism are important. But again I know that what they really want to tell and the situation they talk is very different and uncommon also. In my country and maybe in many Eastern countries, it is usual to think man and woman are different and some cases they are really respected as different gender and so as for their life and purposes also, but this not what I want to explain yet, my point is, back to the two-last sentences before, is by placing the tricky and not mention clearly in their article headline and first picture in their published posting, I got impression they did take and make situation like, this is good to educating Indonesian boys to be feminist now. This is not very common in my county even as today and make the hidden massage that every developed countries are supporting the idea about boys with feminist label so should Indonesia also. To be honest I do for through some difficulties to explain this in English to my fellow Indonesian friends in social media. I don't regret there must be some complaining and arguing everywhere about how my opinion be different, I just regret they do not read the whole article and rethinking couple times about this biased by placement side of the Indonesian News & Media Website in their official Facebook page just because so many Indonesian people now began to like and follow this T something's publication (last time I check they got 228,215 people like this and 232,515 people follow this in their official Facebook page considering this was one the newest Indonesia news and media website) with maybe not really understand that most of Indonesia medias are not fair and still have some the business or political or social interest in package with their opinions. I still believe that both traditional and social media have power and responsibility as the agent of truth-telling to the society. So when their publication went out off the border or gain some false massages to spread out, the victim is not someone else, but us.

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 Course Overview Introduction to Media Literacy


Welcome to English for Media Literacy from the University of Pennsylvania

Dear Yose Rizal Triarto,

Welcome to English for Media Literacy! This course is designed for non-native English speakers who are interested in learning more about U.S. media literacy, how it impacts society, and how it shapes public opinion. We are excited to have you in the course and look forward to helping you improve English language skills necessary for analyzing, evaluating, and synthesizing mass media.

To begin, we recommend taking the time to review the course site. In “Course Content” you will find all of the course video lectures, readings, games, and quizzes. You can also navigate to the course quizzes and assessments under the “Assignments” tab. Click “Discussions” to see forums where you can discuss the course material with fellow students taking the class.

This course will take six weeks to complete. You can checkout the course schedule below to see a quick overview of the lessons and assignments you’ll complete each week.

Week 1-2: What is Media Literacy?
Assessment 1: Reading Comprehension: Predicting beforereading, identifying main ideas and details, understanding new vocabulary
Assessment 2: Spoken Discussion Board: Define media literacy in your own words

Week 2-3: Fact vs.Opinion (Bias)
Assessment 1: Word Choice: Identifying language with negative/positive connotations
Assessment 2: Spoken Discussion Board: Share your thoughts on how the attached print at chooses certain language to express specific opinion

Week 3-4: Social Media vs. Traditional Media
Assessment 1: Comparatives/Superlatives
Assessment 2: Written Discussion Board: Compare and contrast the differences between social media and traditional media

Week 5-6: Gender and Identity
Assessment 1: Summaries
Assessment 2: Written Discussion Board: Summarize astereotypical role that the media portrays for either males or females

Final Project: Create an advertisement for a product using social media

We look forward to having you in class!

Sincerely,
Ian Nichols and the English for Media Literacy Team

--- 
English for Media Literacy

About this course: 

Welcome to English for Media Literacy, a course created by the University of Pennsylvania, and funded by the U.S. Department of State Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, Office of English Language Programs.

This course is designed for non-native English speakers who are interested in learning more about U.S. media literacy. In this course, you will explore different types of mass media; such as, newspapers, magazines, television, and social media. This course will also give you the opportunity to develop a broader understanding of the role media plays in our lives, while building your vocabulary and giving you the language skills needed to analyze what you read and watch. The first unit in this course will provide an introduction to media literacy and give you an opportunity to evaluate your own media literacy level. In unit 2, you will learn how to identify facts versus opinions in the media. The next unit in the course will focus on the differences between social media and traditional media, while unit 4 will look at how gender and identity are covered in the media. In the final unit of the course, you will demonstrate your increased media literacy by through a culminating final project on social media. 

Anyone may take this course for free and get a Statement of Accomplishment issued by the University of Pennsylvania. If you want to get a Coursera Verified Certificate for free, please fill out the Financial Aid form. 

Development of this course was funded by the U.S. Department of State Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs Office of English Language Programs. Unless otherwise noted, all course materials are available for re-use, repurposing and free distribution under a Creative Commons 4.0 Attribution license.

Created by: University of Pennsylvania
University of Pennsylvania
Taught by: Lauren Fiori, Advising Specialist
English Language Programs
Taught by: Ian Nichols, Language Specialist
English Language Programs

---
English language learners! Participate in the "English for Media Literacy" MOOC starting October 16! During this FREE, five-week online course, learners will develop and practice English language skills related to different forms of media. Learners will develop critical thinking skills as they read and evaluate different types of media, such as social media, blogs, podcasts, television, film, newspapers, and magazines. Enroll for FREE today, but hurry, enrollment ends October 21! All prospective learners can register by visiting www.tinyurl.com/moocmedia

Tuesday, November 7, 2017

E-Certificate INOMN 2017, "Jogja Nyawang Rembulan"


Terima kasih untuk kesempatan dan apresiasinya Jogja Astro Club (JAC)​ dan Taman Pintar Yogyakarta​ untuk kesempatan dan apresiasinya.

E-Certificate INOMN 2017, "Jogja Nyawang Rembulan"

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Jogja Astro Club (JAC)
October 18 at 5:33am

JOGJA NYAWANG REMBULAN

Halo warga Jogja!! Dalam rangka International Observe the Moon Night (InOMN) 2017, ayo bersama-sama kita nyawang rembulan! Ada apa sih di Bulan? Di event ini, anda dapat menyaksikan permukaan Bulan dengan teleskop. Wow, kira-kira gimana ya bentuknya? Selain itu, anda juga akan mendapatkan banyak ilmu seputar Bulan. Yuk langsung datang saja . .
πŸŒ• Hari/tgl: SABTU, 28 Oktober 2017
πŸ•– Waktu: 19.00-21.30 WIB
🏠Tempat: Taman Pintar Yogyakarta
πŸ”­ Acara: Pengamatan Bulan dengan Teleskop, Kuliah Umum dengan tema "Bulan", Pameran Poster Bulan, Peragaan Simulator Fase Bulan, dan Peragaan Roket Air

Nah, mari ajak keluarga, teman, saudara, untuk datang bersama untuk nyawang rembulan. Acara terbuka untuk umum dan GRATIS. Jadi, rugi banget kalau tidak hadir 😊

GRATIS !
CP: 0858 6946 8769 (Fadhillah) . .

#pictoftheday #inomn2017 #astronomy #jogja #jogjapunyaacara #eventjogja #eventjogjakarta #inomnjogja - #regrann

Monday, November 6, 2017

UNTUNG TAK DAPAT DIRAIH, MALANG TAK DAPAT DITOLAK

 

Di awal bulan ini total sudah 4-5x sy mengalami kehilangan & keterlambatan penerimaan pendapatan. Mulai dari musibah sakit beberapa hari, tak ada bukaan lowongan untuk pasien simulasi, kehilangan royalti karena kecelakaan dari rekan usaha, keterlambatan pengiriman honor menulis, hingga ketidakjelasan pengumuman penerimaan naskah salah satu buletin nasional sampai hari ini.

Semuanya boleh dikata adalah kejadian langka karena baru kali ini sy alami berturut-turut. Banyak rencana yang seharusnya bisa dieksekusi dengan lancar malah jadi berantakan akhirnya. Dan jujur rasanya memang sangat tidak menyenangkan dan menyesakkan sekali mengingat bagaimana kita sudah berusaha keras dan merencanakannya sebaik mungkin.

Tapi kalau yang namanya sudah musibah mau bagaimana lagi ya? Itu semua di luar kemauan dan kemampuan kita sebagai manusia biasa, bukan?

Mungkin ini memang bisa jadi adalah pelajaran untuk sy pribadi ke depannya. Mungkin supaya sy bisa lebih berpositip thingking macam motivator-motivator ternama, yang biasanya dalam kondisi 'mepet &mpet' begini, selalu ngomong, "selalu ada pelangi sehabis hujan".

Eh sebentar-sebentar, tapi yang namanya pelangi dan hujan kan memang gk butuh makan?! Duh kenapa sih kadang-kadang kerjaan motivator itu cuma asal main comot aja buat ngejual isi kepala dan perutnya aja. Ya nggak? Hehe.

Yah apapun alasannya, selamat datang bulan November 2017. Walau uda telat ngucapin & seperti judul tulisannya, untung tak dapat diraih dan malang tak dapat ditolak, manusia harus tetap berjalan, harus tetap menulis, dan harus tetap makan.

Manusia memang lebih mudah menghitung kegagalan ketimbang menghitung kebaikan Tuhan. Padahal kita masih bisa menghirup oksigen gratis & menikmati hujan di pagi hari tadi  sebetulnya adalah beberapa berkat yang sering terlupakan.

Ok jadi selamat melanjutkan semua aktivitas kita masing-masing apapun itu. Jangan cepat menyerah, jangan berputus asa. Terus berpengharapan, terus mencoba lagi dan mencoba lagi. 

Proses tidak akan pernah mengkhianati hasil. Pasti suatu saat akan berhasil juga. Nah kalau sudah berhasil, inga-inga, jangan lupa makan-makan dan jangan kau lupakan juga kawan lama yaa :-).